Glutathione is known as the ‘mother of all antioxidants’ and ireduces oxidative stress in the body. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance between the production of free radicals and the body’s ability to fight them off. Too-high levels of oxidative stress may be a precursor to multiple diseases. These include diabetes, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Glutathione can reduce cell damage in fatty liver disease and may help fight against auto-immune disease.  

Glutathione levels in the body may be reduced by a number of factors, including poor nutrition, environmental toxins, and stress. Its levels also decline with age. 

And important to note:  your liver quickly breaks down glutathione, so oral supplements do not work. Advanced supplement forms, such as sublingual or liposomal glutathione bypass the liver.  

Foods that naturally contain glutathione include: 

Asparagus, avocado, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, spinach, broccoli, garlic, chives, tomatoes, cucumber, almonds, and walnuts.  

However, a variety of factors can affect the levels of this vital nutrient, including storage and cooking. In fact, cooking these foods can reduce their glutathione content by 30 to 60 percent. 

Our liposomal glutathione goes swiftly to the bloodstream contained within the liposomes.